Le Coq, Albert von (1860 - 1930) [sv]

Le Coq, Albert von (swedish)

Personer med anknytning till Världskulturmuseerna (Statens museer för världskultur) [sv]

Description
Albert von Le Coq, tysk arkeolog, verksam i Asien. [sv]
Life role
Dataset owner
License
Public Domain Dedication (CC0) applies to the information on this page and not any works/objects created by the actor
Last changed
21/01/2018 11:40:03
31/07/2021 12:50:53
Published
Status

URI
http://kulturnav.org/cf6108e0-cf15-43f6-a1d5-07422cd67b0e | RDF/XML | JSON-LD
Name
Le Coq, Albert von
Swedish

First name
Albert
Swedish

Last name
Le Coq
Swedish

Alternative name
von Le Coq, Albert
Swedish

Title
arkeolog

-Title
arkeolog
Swedish
professor

-Title
professor
Swedish
Description
Albert von Le Coq, tysk arkeolog, verksam i Asien.
Swedish

Wikipedia

Birth
1860

-Time
1860
Death
1930

-Time
1930
Life role
-Life role
English

Norwegian bokmål

Swedish

Estonian

Finnish

Spanish

Dutch
Nationality

Norwegian bokmål

Swedish

Biography

Albert von Le Coq (1860–1930) was a German archaeologist and explorer of Central Asia. He was heir to a sizable fortune derived from breweries and wineries scattered throughout Central and Eastern Europe, thus allowing him the luxury of travel and study at the - no longer existing - Ethnology Museum (German: Museum für Völkerkunde) in Berlin. Serving as assistant to the head of the Museum, Professor Albert Grünwedel, Le Coq helped plan and organize expeditions into the regions of western Asia, specifically areas near the Silk Road such as Gaochang. When Grünwedel fell ill before the departure of the second expedition, Le Coq was assigned to lead it. His account of the second and third German Turpan expeditions was published in English in 1928 as "Buried Treasures of Chinese Turkestan". The expeditions found extensive networks of Buddhist and Manichaean cave temples in the Xinjiang region of Northwest China. Although many of the manuscripts found in the cave were destroyed during the excavation, von Le Coq speculated that he had discovered a major Manichaean library. Some of the paintings also led him to believe that he had found evidence of an "Aryan" culture, related to the Franks. With the help of his assistant Bartus, Le Coq carved and sawed away over 360 kilograms (or 305 cases) of artifacts, wall-carvings, and precious icons, which were subsequently shipped to the museum. In Buried Treasures ..., Le Coq defends these "borrowings" as a matter of necessity, citing the turbulent nature of Chinese Turkestan at the time of the expeditions. Chinese consider this seizure a "colonial rapacity" comparable to the taking of the Elgin Marbles or the Koh-i-Noor diamond. The artifacts were put on display at the museum and were open to the public until 1944 when the relics were destroyed in a British bombing raid during World War II. Le Coq said that the depictions of figures with apparently blue eyes, red hair and cruciform swords resembled Frankish art: "Such more striking are representations of red-haired, blue-eyed men with faces of a pronounced European type. We connect these people with the Aryan language found in these parts in so many manuscripts.. These red haired people wear suspenders from their belts.. a remarkable ethnological peculiarity. (wikipedia, 2012-01-30)

English

Albert von Le Coq, tysk arkeolog, verksam i Asien.

Swedish

Activity
, , Kina [sv]

-Place reference
, , Kina [sv]
--Place (text)
Kina
Swedish
Residence
, , Tyskland [sv]

-Place reference
, , Tyskland [sv]
--Place (text)
Tyskland
Swedish
Carlotta-SMVK
3213078

-Id
3213078
-System
Carlotta-SMVK
DigitaltMuseum
021037461645
-Id
021037461645
-System
DigitaltMuseum