Polhem, Christopher (1661 - 1751) [sv]

Polhem, Christopher (swedish)

Inventors in Sweden (National Museum of Science and Technology)

Description
Christopher Polhem was an industrialist and inventor way ahead of his time. In 1716, he was ennobled by King Charles XII of Sweden for his contributions to Sweden's technological development.
Life role
Dataset owner
National Museum of Science and Technology (Museum) owns the information on this page
Contact information
Datasetets innehåll: samlingsinfo@tekniskamuseet.se [sv]
Personuppgifter: info@tekniskamuseet.se [sv]
License
Public Domain Dedication (CC0) applies to the information on this page and not any works/objects created by the actor
Last changed
13/11/2019 15:36:02
23/05/2020 06:54:41
Published
Status

URI
http://kulturnav.org/d6e19ad6-e77b-43f9-b183-7b2929b5a6a1 | RDF/XML | JSON-LD
Name
Polhem, Christopher
Swedish

First name
Christopher
Swedish

Last name
Polhem
Swedish

Title
Uppfinnare

-Title
Uppfinnare
Swedish
Description
Christopher Polhem was an industrialist and inventor way ahead of his time. In 1716, he was ennobled by King Charles XII of Sweden for his contributions to Sweden's technological development.
English

Med en outtröttlig energi och framåtanda verkade Christopher Polhem som företagare och uppfinnare i ett land som under hans livstid gick från stormakt till vetenskapsnation. 1716 adlades han av Karl XII för sina insatser för Sveriges tekniska utveckling.
Swedish

Wikipedia (via Wikidata)

Wikipedia (via Wikidata)

Wikipedia (via Wikidata)

Wikipedia (via Wikidata)

Wikipedia (via Wikidata)

Birth
18/12/1661

-Time
18/12/1661
Death
30/08/1751

-Time
30/08/1751
Life role
-Life role
English

Norwegian bokmål

Swedish

Estonian

Finnish
Gender
Man
English

Norwegian bokmål

Man
Swedish

Estonian

Biography

Christopher Polhem’s parents were Christina Eriksdotter Schening from Vadstena, Sweden and Wulf Christopher Polhammar, a German merchant who immigrated to Visby where Christopher Polhem was born in 1661. He was orphaned at the age of eight. After a couple of years living with his uncle in Stockholm, he took a job as a farmhand in Uppland. Having a talent for mathematics, he soon became supervisor at Vansta Manor Farm in Södermanland, where he remained until 1685.

Christopher became more and more interested in technology and engineering, and set up a workshop for himself where he made tools, utensils and clocks.

Studies in Uppsala
Christopher began studying at Uppsala University in 1687. He managed to repair two astronomical clocks for his entrance examination. After which he studied mathematics, physics and engineering for three years until he felt he had studied enough. By which time he had also managed to repair the Uppsala Cathedral astronomical clock which had ceased to function. This achievement meant that Christopher Polhem’s reputation as a skilled engineer spread quickly.

Mining technology
In 1693, Christopher was commissioned to improve the technology for extracting ore from mines. When the construction model was complete, he was permitted to show it to Charles XII of Sweden. The king was impressed and gave him the go-ahead. The machine transported ore from the mines in barrels, conveyed them to the smelting house where the barrels were emptied and then returned to the mine for a new load. Everything was automated, requiring no manual interaction except the loading of the ore into the barrels that were to be lifted out of the mine. This type of construction was called a hauling plant and was hydro-powered. Power was transferred to the machine from the water wheel with the help of linkage. This hauling plant was called the Blankstötsspelet (the Great Pit winder) after the pit at the Falu copper mine, where it was installed in 1694.

The Swedish Board of Mines appointed Christopher Polhem as Director of Mine Engineering in 1698. Two years later he became ‘Art Master’ of the Falu mine. The Art Master supervised the extraction of ore from the mine and the machines being used.

Field trips
In order to see and learn about the technologies being used abroad, Christopher Polhem was awarded a travel grant by the king. In 1694, a journey began that would take him to Germany, Holland, England and France, where he studied structural engineering and factories. He is likely to have accumulated many ideas and impressions and brought them home with him.

Manufacturing plant in Stiernsund
At this time, a lot of people believed that more goods should be produced nationally instead of selling the raw materials abroad and then buying them back as expensive finished products.
For this reason, in 1700 Christopher Polhem and Gabriel Stierncrona established a manufacturing plant, a factory, in southern Dalarna, Sweden. The factory was named after financial backer, Stierncrona, and the former name of the site, Sund. The manufacturing plant was thereby christened Stiernsund, a place where Christopher wanted to produce everyday household items. He also started manufacturing clock parts, something that would greatly facilitate clock repairing.

Everything was to be as rational as possible. Machines instead of people were to produce the goods. This was unique for that time. Christopher invented and installed a lot of ingenious machines at Stiernsund.

Christopher Polhem’s wife passed away in 1735 and he left Stiernsund to reside with his daughter and son-in-law in Stockholm. Two years later, the facility at Stiernsund was ravaged by a fire, destroying most of the buildings and machines. After reconstruction, however, the operation continued long after his time.

Pedagogy – Laboratorium Mechanicum
Christopher Polhem felt that a technical laboratory would be an important part of future engineering education. Which was why he established the Laboratorium Mechanicum in 1697. The intention was to teach, research and demonstrate to visitors everything that could be achieved within technology and engineering.

The mechanical alphabet
Part of the pedagogy was to illustrate all of the machinery elements that every engineer should be familiar with. The mechanical alphabet was the name he gave to collection of wooden models that demonstrated simple principles for motion conversion and which was used in teaching. The collection was returned to Stockholm after Christopher Polhem´s death and became part of the Royal Model Chamber. Nowadays, the remains of the Model Chamber are part of the National Museum of Science and Technology’s collection, and are on display in the Christopher Polhem exhibition.

When the model collections were in Stiernsund, they were used in the teaching of engineering. The Swedish Board of Mines awarded scholarships for studies in engineering at Stiernsund. Students, Carl Johan Cronstedt and Augustin Ehrensvärd, who were there in 1729, gave testament in words and images to the operation. Their notebooks are still held in the archives at the National Museum of Science and Technology.

Sluices, dams and canals
The construction of sluices, dams and docks was also something that Christopher Polhem tackled. The falls at Trollhättan needed sluices so that the freight being shipped along the Göta River didn’t have to continue on land. He had plans for this, which he worked on together with his then assistant, Emanuel Swedenborg. Educated at Uppsala, Emanuel was a scientist, engineer and subsequently religious philosopher. The sluice project was completed in 1754, after the death of Christopher Polhem.

Christopher Polhem and Charles XII of Sweden also had plans to build a canal that would connect Sweden from east to west. The Göta Canal was, however, not completed until the following century, in 1832.

The Sluice construction in Stockholm was Christopher Polhem’s final undertaking. He was now old and had to be carried down to the sluice to see his work, which was led by his son, Gabriel. Christopher Polhem died in 1751 at the age of 90.

English

Barndom och ungdom
Christopher Polhems föräldrar var Christina Eriksdotter Schening från Vadstena och Wulf Christopher Polhammar, en tysk köpman som invandrat till Visby där Christopher Polhem föddes 1661.

Som åttaåring blev han faderlös. Efter ett par år hos sin farbror i Stockholm började han som smådräng på en Upplandsgård. Den i räkning begåvade pojken blev med tiden inspektor på Vansta säteri i Södermanland, där han blev kvar till år 1685.

Christopher Polhem blev nu alltmer intresserad av teknik och mekanik. Han inrättade en verkstad åt sig, där han tillverkade redskap, verktyg och klockor.
Med insikt om sina brister i teoretiska kunskaper, kontaktade han flera präster i syfte att lära sig latin. Målet var att sedan kunna läsa vid universitetet.

Studier i Uppsala
Christopher Polhem började studera vid Uppsala universitet 1687. Som "inträdesprov" lyckades han laga två astronomiska ur. Därefter studerade han matematik, fysik och mekanik i tre år, innan han ansåg sig färdig. Då hade han också hunnit med att reparera domkyrkans astronomiska ur som slutat fungera. Detta var en bedrift som gjorde att Christopher Polhems rykte som en skicklig mekaniker spred sig.

Gruvteknik
1693 fick han i uppdrag att förbättra tekniken för att ta upp malm ur gruvor. När konstruktionen var färdig i modell fick han visa upp den för Karl XI. Kungen blev imponerad av Christopher Polhems arbete och gav honom klartecken.
Principen var att maskinen transporterade malmen ur gruvan i tunnor, förde dessa till hyttan där tunnorna tömdes och sedan återgick till gruvan för ny lastning. Allt gjordes mekaniskt utan manuellt ingripande förutom vid lastningen av malmen i de tunnor som skulle hissas upp ur gruvan. Denna typ av konstruktioner kallades uppfordringsverk. Detta drevs av ett vattenhjul.öppnas i nytt fönster Från vattenhjulet överfördes kraften till maskinen med hjälp av stånggångar. I själva uppfordringsverket ersatte parallella trästänger de linor man tidigare använt för att hissa upp tunnorna ur gruvan. Trästängerna fördes växelvis uppåt och nedåt och tunnan klättrade först på den ena och sen på den andra med hjälp av de hakar som var fästade på stängerna. Detta uppfordringsverk kallades Blankstötsspelet efter det gruvhål i Falu koppargruva där det installerades 1694.

Bergskollegium utnämnde Christopher Polhem till direktör över bergsmekaniken år 1698. Två år senare blev han konstmästare vid Falu gruva. Konstmästaren var den som hade ansvaret för att ta upp malm ur gruvan och för de maskiner som man utnyttjade för detta.

Studieresor
För att se och lära om teknik i utlandet beviljades Christopher Polhem ett resestipendium av kungen. 1694 började en resa som förde honom till Tyskland, Holland, England och Frankrike. Han studerade där tekniska konstruktioner och anläggningar som dammar och slussar. Säkert tog han många intryck och idéer med sig hem.

Manufakturverket i Stiernsund
På den här tiden tyckte många att vi i Sverige borde tillverka mer varor inom landet i stället för att sälja råvaror till utlandet och sedan köpa tillbaka dem dyrt som bearbetade, färdiga produkter.

Med detta som syfte grundade Christopher Polhem och Gabriel Stierncrona år 1700 ett manufakturverk, en fabrik, i södra Dalarna. Anläggningen namngavs efter finansiären Stierncrona och det tidigare namnet på platsen, som var Sund. Manufakturverket kom alltså att heta Stiernsund. Här ville Christopher Polhem tillverka vardagsvaror att sälja till hushållen. Han startade också tillverkning av delar till ur, vilka skulle underlätta urmakarnas arbete.

Allt skulle göras så rationellt som möjligt. Maskiner i stället för människor skulle stå för produktionen. Det var något unikt på den tiden och idéerna stötte också på motstånd från arbetarna. Många sinnrika maskiner uppfanns och installerades av Christopher Polhem i Stiernsund. Ett exempel är den maskin för att tillverka kugghjul som idag finns utställd på Tekniska museet.

Ekonomiskt var verksamheten inte en framgång och han hade själv inte tillräckligt med tid att övervaka produktionen - det fick hans son och svåger göra. Karl XII, som nu var kung, lovade skattefrihet för Stiernsund i syfte att förbättra dess ekonomi.

1735 dog Christopher Polhems hustru, varpå han lämnade Stiernsund för att slå sig ner hos sin dotter och måg i Stockholm. Två år senare härjades Stiernsund av en brand som förstörde det mesta av anläggningens byggnader och maskiner. Efter återuppbyggnaden fortsatte dock verksamheten även efter hans tid.

Pedagogik - Laboratorium Mechanicum
Ett tekniskt laboratorium skulle vara en viktig del i utbildningen av framtidens mekaniker tyckte Christopher Polhem. Därför grundade han Laboratorium Mechanicum 1697. Avsikten var att undervisa, forska och demonstrera för besökare allt som kunde göras inom teknik och mekanik. Hantverkare skulle arbeta med att framställa modeller, medan Christopher Polhem som föreståndare skulle forska och undervisa eleverna med hjälp av modellerna.

Det mekaniska alfabetet
En del i pedagogiken var att åskådliggöra alla de maskinelement som varje konstruktör måste kunna. "Det mekaniska alfabetet", kallade han en samling modeller i trä som visade enkla principer för rörelseomvandling och som användes i undervisningen. Så småningom flyttades hela samlingen till Falun och senare till Stiernsund. Den återfördes till Stockholm efter Christopher Polhems död och uppgick i den Kungliga Modellkammaren. I dag finns resterna av modellkammaren i Tekniska museets samlingar.

Då modellsamlingen fanns i Stiernsund användes den i undervisning i mekanik. Bergskollegium lät utdela stipendier för studier i mekanik vid Stiernsund. Eleverna Carl Johan Cronstedt och Augustin Ehrensvärd, som var där 1729 har lämnat vittnesbörd i ord och bild om verksamheten. Deras anteckningsböcker finns bevarade i Tekniska museets arkiv.

Anläggningar
Att bygga slussar, dammar och skeppsdockor var också uppgifter som Christopher Polhem gav sig i kast med. Trollhättefallen behövde slussar för att båtfrakterna på Göta älv inte skulle behöva avbrytas av landtransport. Han hade planer för detta som han utarbetade tillsammans med sin dåvarande assistent, Emanuel Swedenborgöppnas i nytt fönster. Denne var utbildad i Uppsala, vetenskapsman, tekniker och sedermera religionsfilosof. Slussprojektet kunde av ekonomiska skäl ej genomföras förrän 1747 och var klart 1754, efter Christopher Polhems död.

Christopher Polhem och Karl XII hade även planer på att bygga en kanal som skulle sammanbinda Sverige från väster till öster. Denna Göta kanal stod dock ej färdig förrän i nästa århundrade, 1832.

Slussbygget i Stockholm var det sista stora åtagandet för Christopher Polhem. Han var nu gammal och fick bäras ner till slussen för att se sitt verk. Arbetet leddes av hans son Gabriel. Christopher Polhem dog 1751, 90 år gammal.

Text: Peter Du Rietz och Inger Björklund

Swedish

-Text
Westerlund, Kerstin (2000). Christopher Polhem: konstruktör och företagare i 1700-talets Sverige. Stockholm: Tekniska museet
Swedish
DigitaltMuseum
021036797375
-Id
021036797375
-System
DigitaltMuseum